A different kind of a h...
(Posted 8th March 2017)
Gol gappas or gold meda...
(Posted 1st January 2017)
Strategic importance of...
(Posted 28th June 2016)
The art of taking on gi...
(Posted 6th June 2016)
Anushka’s trolling come...
(Posted 15th May 2016)
Goose pimple stuff: All...
(Posted 15th May 2016)
Well played sir!: All t...
(Posted 15th May 2016)
Mobiles, mobility and t...
(Posted 15th May 2016)
Where in the food chain...
(Posted 12th February 2014)
Return of the angry you...
(Posted 4th January 2015)
Amul – ye butter hai ya...
(Posted 18th December 2014)
Who’s your enemy?
(Posted 15th November 2014)
Six pack abs, designer ...
(Posted 18th September 2014)
Are we falling in love ...
(Posted 12th September 2014)
Is your brand missing i...
(Posted 15th April 2014)
Brand rejuvenation: is ...
(Posted 27th March 2014)
Aren’t the new age bran...
(Posted 12th February 2014)
Why brand managers shou...
(Posted 25th March 2014)
Why the cricket team’s ...
(22nd January 2012)
Shallow shlacking: why ...
(Posted 1st February 2012)
Shall we stop targeting...
(5th February 2012)
How do you sleep at nig...
(17th June 2012)
Is there a problem in y...
(25th January 2012)

Goose pimple stuff: All time awesome campaigns in India – I


goose-pimple-stuff-all-time-awesome-campaigns-india-i-amit

More than a decade after this campaign had been aired, I shared it in a training session with a young DDB Mudra team. ‘This is goose pimple stuff’ muttered one of the team members who had not seen it earlier.

Indeed, it is. One that was a hard act to follow even for Bajaj. Nothing they did after this came even close.

As it happens with great work, a lot of pieces fall in place just about perfectly here – the brand’s problem definition, a larger life insight that was particularly sharp at the time of this campaign and a wonderful category and brand connect.


The opening up of India’s economy and media created an interesting tussle, both for Indians and Indian brands. As sexier western values of individualistic freedom started to waft across, so did first time access to many international brands we had only wistfully fantasised about.

As the youth celebrated, the society worried about its corrosive effects on our culture.

In automobiles, it was an obvious threat to brands like Bajaj, up against Japanese brands like Honda, Yamaha etc. who had clear advantage in technological expertise and even greater edge on desirability.

Instead of responding defensively with an ‘India can make it better’ message, Bajaj & Lintas located the sweet spot between the insight and the brand’s problem.

That Indian youth were not going to ‘lose it’, even as they adopted what they liked from the west. Not in areas that mattered.

In addressing the conflict, while it reassured the society, it simultaneously won over the youth for having redeemed them on a public platform.

2 wheelers were emerging symbols of individualistic freedom, specially for the youth (from the bygone era of family riding on scooters). So a message on what Indian youth would do with their freedom was a great category fit.

Coming as it did from the quintessential Indian brand that had been associated with the images of mummy, papa, bunty and pinky on a scooter, it was a great makeover even as it did not forget its roots.

What have been your all time favourite campaigns?