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A different kind of a hero


A different kind of a hero

Dads have always had the desire as well as the pressure to be their child’s hero. Be it Dhara’s ‘my daddy strongest’, Revital’s dad training to win against the neighborhood dad and many similar examples, dads have been targeted by brands to live up to their child’s image of them. While health and physical prowess is one territory for such messaging, an even bigger space is a man’s role and ability as a provider.

With exploding basket of goodies to splurge on and the rising power position of children, it would be a rare parent who has not experienced the pressure from their child to buy the bigger and better version of everything.

And the dads have responded - by putting on hold their own desires, buying on credit and personal loans, pushing to earn more …doing all they can to stay above this wave of consumerism that however, just doesn’t seem to abate.

As one dad put it – ‘as children, we felt happy when something new was bought for us, today, no matter what you buy, you can see a bigger, better version you have not been able to afford…it dampens any joy of having bought something!’

It is in this context that fathers have started to experience and express a different desire. Tired of being the ATMs of the house, they are keen to access the nurturing side of themselves as parents. Being providers of not just the goodies, but care, nurturance, good values and being shapers of character.

When it comes to buying something as significant as a car, the provider role comes into sharp focus. What with parents of kids in the peer group owning the fancier cars, the pressure is immense. Buying a hatchback like Wagon R raises this issue with rapidly rising benchmarks in cars. Do you risk feeling like a loser in front of your family? Especially your child?



Wagon R’s new commercial addresses this dilemma by creating a new kind of a hero in the dad. The one who dances with joy when his kid wins, makes it to every birthday party and keeps up the myth of Santa Clause for his child. ‘My papa is not the best, he is great’ says the voice-over.

While this is definitely not the first portrayal of a nurturing caring father in advertising, its usage in the context of a car that might otherwise put the provider in a somewhat defensive position is what makes this one interesting.

#WagonR #EverydayGreatness #MakeEverydayGreat